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Station or Northfield Falls, Washington County

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Inventory Number: VT/45-12-08
County: Washington County
Township: Northfield
Town/Village: Northfield Falls
Bridge Name: Station or Northfield Falls
Crosses: Dog River
Truss type: Town
Spans: 1+
Length: 137'
Roadway Width:
Built: 1872
Builder:
When Lost: standing
Cause:
Latitude: N44 10.347
Longitude: W072 39.090
See a map of the area
Topographic map of the area
Directions: 210 feet west of VT12 and main intersection in Northfield Falls on Cox Brook Rd.

Station or Northfield Falls Bridge, Northfield, Washington County, VT Built 1872
Bill Caswell Photo, October 2007


Station or Northfield Falls Bridge, Northfield, Washington County, VT Built 1872
Bill Caswell Photo, October 2007


Station or Northfield Falls Bridge, Northfield, Washington County, VT Built 1872
Bill Caswell Photo, May 11, 1985


Station or Northfield Falls Bridge, Northfield, Washington County, VT Built 1872
Richard E. Roy Collection


Station or Northfield Falls Bridge, Northfield, Washington County, VT Built 1872
Bob Sheldon Photo, September 10, 2011

Comments:
In 1963 the bridge was strengthened with the addition of four steel beams and a central pier. It was again strengthened in 1993 when the original deck system was repaired. The original non-mortared stone abutments remain, but cast concrete caps have been added. In 1978 the bridges siding was repaired and it was painted barn red inside and out. Circa 2002 a new standing-seam steel roof was installed. All three Cox Brook Road bridges are painted barn red. A sign over the portal proclaims "Town Lattice 1872", and a rare cast iron sign spells out "Speed Limit horses at a walk motor vehicle 10 miles per hour." It was named for the former railroad depot close by. This is one of three locations in the United States where two covered bridges stand near each other. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on August 13, 1974.
Sources:
Conwill, Joseph D.. Images of America - Vermont Covered Bridges, 2004, page 88
National Society for the Preservation of Covered Bridges. World Guide to Covered Bridges, 2009, page 149

Compilation © 2018 Covered Spans of Yesteryear


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